Knitting Socks To Accommodate Bunions

Bunions can be sensitive and tender.  They also artificially enlarge the circumference of a foot if the foot measurement includes the bunion which can result in a sock that fits the bunion well, but is loose and baggy on the rest of the foot.  Here are some tips and tricks for knitting socks to fit feet with bunions:

  • Use very soft yarn.  Bunions can be sensitive and tender and benefit from some extra softness and cushioning.  

  • Use a thicker yarn to provide extra cushioning around the bunion.  This can be a bit tricky because if the yarn is too thick the wearer’s shoes might not fit properly, so it will take some trial and error.  

  • Work increases around the bunion.  Warning: math ahead!  If the foot circumference before the bunion is 8 inches and the foot circumference including the bunion is 9 inches and your stitch gauge is 8 stitches per inch, you can increase an extra 8 stitches (4 stitches on either side of the toe) leading up to the bunion and then decrease those extra stitches after the bunion. This becomes tricky if you’re working a stitch pattern and may mean either stopping the stitch pattern early (if you're knitting cuff down) or starting it a bit late (if you’re knitting toe up).

  • Create a small gusset for the bunion.  This is my favourite option, because I love short rows, but it will result in anatomical socks (socks that have specific left and right feet that aren’t interchangeable).  When you reach the bunion-part of the sock, you create a tiny short row heel where the bunion is to cushion and accommodate the bunion.  Again, you’ll need to know the circumference of the foot with and without the bunion and again, this will disrupt any pattern stitch that you’re knitting on the sock.

Do you have experience knitting socks to accommodate bunions?  I'd love to know what tips and tricks you use.  

Happy Knitting! 

New Sock Pattern Alert!!

Halcyon has been released into the world...

In the depths of winter when Carolien (the dyer at Colourful Creativity) and I were brainstorming ideas for a spring sock design, we were both inspired by the first flush of spring. That magical time when the world wakes up from its long winter nap and trees are re-born from brown and barren to lush with foliage in bright shades of green. That time when the sun is so bright and warm that it makes everything it shines on look a little brighter. When the first blooms of the season open and their burst of colour changes not only the landscape but everyone’s mood; even the birds seem to sing more loudly and happily. The first word that came to mind for me was halcyon.

Halcyon is an adjective that is defined as:
Denoting a period of time in the past that was idyllically happy and peaceful.

This pattern and this yarn are designed to remind you of the halcyon days of spring when the world feels (if only for a moment) idyllically happy and peaceful. The yarn is called 'Spring Fling' and it's a limited edition yarn that's being released at the same time as this pattern.  You can find 'Spring Fling' here.  (The rainbow donegal specks are really cool - this was my first time working with them and I'll definitely be knitting with this yarn again).

Halcyon is worked from the toe up and features ribbing across the top of the toe and foot. Gusset increases are moved from the sides of the foot to the instep to accommodate the emerging floral stitchthat starts on the top of the foot and continues up the front of the leg. The sock ends with a ribbed cuff.

The pattern is graded for 4 circumferences and foot length is customizable. Halcyon is available with a 20% introductory discount until Monday May 14th (no coupon code required, the discount will be applied automagically at checkout). 


In Other News...

Thanks to your support of Dolores 2 weeks ago, I was able to make a donation to the Centre For Addiction and Mental Health.  Thank you.  This proves once again that the fibre community is awesome and that knitting really does make the world a better place! 

Knitter, Heel Thyself!

See what I did there? I made a heel pun! 

There are a lot of heel construction options for sock knitters.  I'm often asked 'which heel is best?' or 'which heel has the best fit?' or 'What heel do you recommend?'  Truth is, feet are like snowflakes and everyone's are different.  The heel construction that fits my feet won't necessarily work well for your feet.  Or your spouse's feet.  Or your kids' feet.  Or your neighbour's feet.  Or whoever the lucky, knitworthy recipient of your hand knit socks will be.  

I urge all sock knitters to try as many different heel constructions as possible to determine what works best for them fit-wise and knit-wise (not only does a heel need to fit you properly, you should enjoy knitting it).  

Here's a summary of some of the most popular heel constructions and their advantages and disadvantages:

Afterthought Heel

 Rainbow Dash is an example of a sock with an afterthought heel

Rainbow Dash is an example of a sock with an afterthought heel

Advantages

  • Great on-the-go knitting because you don't have to stop to turn the heel

  • Doesn’t interrupt self striping or self patterning yarn

  • Tends to fit feet that are flatter (low instep)

  • Can easily be worked in a contrasting or complementary colour

  • Construction is the same whether worked toe up or cuff down

Disadvantages

  • Doesn’t tend to fit higher insteps or wider heels (tends to slip off)

  • Can result in holes in the corners where the heel stitches are picked up

  • Requires picking up stitches

Short Row Heel

 Wibbly Wobbly Timey Wimey is an example of a sock with a short row heel 

Wibbly Wobbly Timey Wimey is an example of a sock with a short row heel 

Advantages

  • Most popular heel construction

  • Found on commercially made socks

  • Fits flat feet better than feet with a high instep

  • Many variations to choose from (FLK, german short row, wrap and turn, japanese short row, etc.)

  • Less disruptive to self patterning yarn than a heel flap

  • Easy to use a contrasting or complementary yarn

  • Construction is the same whether worked toe up or cuff down

Disadvantages

  • Doesn’t tend to fit high insteps or narrow/wide heels very well (although modifications can be made to accommodate differing foot anatomies)

  • Can be hole-y depending on the short row method used

  • Can result in holes at the corners of the heel

Heel Flap

 Sassenach is an example of a sock that uses heel flap construction

Sassenach is an example of a sock that uses heel flap construction

Advantages

  • Fits most foot anatomies (especially higher insteps)

  • Sturdiest construction

  • Easy to reinforce using double knitting or eye of partridge stitch patterns

  • Is the classic hand knit sock heel

Disadvantages

  • Disrupts the flow of self-patterning yarn

  • Requires picking up stitches for the gussets

  • Uses the most yarn when compared to short row and afterthought heels

  • More difficult to use a contrasting or complementary yarn

  • Construction differs between toe up and cuff down

Strong Heel or Fleegle Heel

 Caffeine is an example of a sock that uses Strong/Fleegle heel construction

Caffeine is an example of a sock that uses Strong/Fleegle heel construction

Advantages

  • No gusset stitches to pick up

  • Less disruptive to self patterning yarn than a traditional heel flap

  • Accommodates wide heels and high insteps

  • Sturdier construction than afterthought or short row heels

  • Construction is very similar for toe up and cuff down

Disadvantages

  • It’s not very intuitive for a new sock knitter as the gussets, heel flap, and instep are worked simultaneously which can be confusing

  • Results in a triangular shaped heel flap (this could be an advantage or a disadvantage depending on your preference)

Do you have a favourite heel construction?  What is it and why?

New Pattern Alert! It's a Twofer!

Dolores has been released into the world...

This design is inspired by the late Dolores O’Riordan, lead singer of The Cranberries. Her haunting voice and angst-filled lyrics were part of the soundtrack of my life in the 1990s. She was unabashedly authentic and honest and stood apart from artists who were carefully constructed by music studios to project a corporately curated physical look and musical sound.

In the days following Dolores’ death, I came across a social media post by Melanie (the dyer behind Baad Mom Yarns ), and she had been inspired to create a custom colourway in tribute to Dolores; I immediately ordered a skein of ‘Monog’ (which happens to be Celtic for ‘cranberry’) and designed this sock.

Dolores is worked from the cuff down and features a unique wrap/drop stitch pattern down the centre of the front and back of the leg. The design continues onto the heel flap. The heel is constructed using a unique centre gusset design and has no gusset stitches to pick up. The stitch design continues on the top of the foot and toe. The toe is grafted closed with Kitchener stitch. The pattern is graded for 4 circumferences, and foot length is customizable. A link to a video tutorial demonstrating the stitch pattern is included in the pattern. 

You can download Dolores with a 20% discount (no coupon code required) until Monday April 30, 2018.  In addition, $1 from each copy of Dolores sold will be donated to CAMH until Monday April 30, 2018.

 


Sock By Numbers Toe Up was also released into the world this week. 

Sock By Numbers isn’t a pattern, it’s a recipe to create a toe up sock using any yarn, any needles, any gauge, for any foot size. This pattern starts with a wedge toe, features a Strong heel (no gusset stitches to pick up!)  and ends with a ribbed cuff. 

This is not a beginner recipe. Some knowledge of sock anatomy is required and spoiler alert: this recipe has a lot of math!

If doing math old school (longhand) isn’t your thing, access to a spreadsheet to help is included in the pattern.

You can download Sock By Numbers Toe Up with a 50% discount with the purchase of any other pattern.  Put both patterns in your cart and use the coupon code: Toes

Budgeting For Yarn Purchases

How do you budget for yarn purchases? Do you fund a separate budget category for yarn purchases?  

As a designer, I often get yarn support from dyers for my designs (which is a totally awesome perk!) or I purchase yarn with the proceeds of pattern sales, but what about personal knitting? Instead of a separate category for funding hobbies we like to categorize yarn purchases and spread the expense around.  For example:

Souvenir Yarn

Souvenir yarn is included in our vacation budget.  When we plan a vacation and plan how we're funding the vacation, yarn is included.  It's a given that I will scope out yarn stores before we even leave our house on vacation and that when we've reached our destination I will go to the nearest LYS and pick up some yarn (preferably yarn and dyers that are local to our vacation destination).

Yarn For Gifts

Yarn that I purchase to make gifts is included in our gift budget.  

Yarn For People I Live With

Yarn that I use to make items for myself, the Husbeast, or the Kidlets comes out of our clothing budget.  

Feeding The Stash

Yarn that I purchase without a project in mind for no reason other than because it's beautiful and squishy and I *have* to have it comes from our entertainment budget.  It takes 10-20 hours to knit a pair of socks (depending on foot size and pattern complexity), so if I pay $30 for a skein of sock yarn, I'm paying $2 per hour of entertainment value (assuming I spend 15 hours knitting with it).  I can't even go to a movie for $2 per hour AND when I'm finished with the $30 skein of sock yarn I have a beautiful, useful pair of socks in addition to 15 hours of entertainment.  It's a win-win.  

Knitting Is My Meditation

Knitting is good for my mental health and, therefore by extension, the mental health of those around me.  Sometimes yarn comes from our health and wellness budget since it really is part of my health and wellness plan.  

We also plan my husband's golf hobby by category.  It works well for us.  How do you budget for your hobbies?

What Do April Showers Bring?

April showers bring Greynbows...

A Greynbow is what happens when you combine grey yarn with rainbow yarn!

These were really fun socks to knit!  The stitch pattern looks so great in so many different yarn combinations, that it was difficult to decide on colours for the sample.   

Greynbow is worked toe up and features an easy-to-remember yet slightly addictive slip stitch pattern across the top of the foot and the front and back of the leg. Only one colour is used at a time so there are no floats to carry along the back of your work. (disclaimer: colourwork with no floats is my favourite kind of colourwork) The  heel flap, gussets, and intsep stitches are worked simultaneously in the round (so there are no gusset stitches to pick  up!) and the leg ends with a ribbed cuff.  The stitch pattern is both written and charted. 

The pattern is graded for 4 circumferences and the foot length is customizable.

You can purchase Greynbow with a 20% discount (no coupon code required!) until Monday April 16, 2018.  

Sock Surgery 101: How To Fix Foot Length

This crumply, unblocked, unwoven mess is a design I'm working on.  When it's blocked and woven, it will be spectacular (especially the gussets!) but right now it's a hot mess.  I got carried away watching Netflix and working the foot at the same time and now the foot is about 2 inches too long, so today I'm going to show you how I fixed it.  

 This beautiful green yarn with rainbow donegal flecks is by Colourful Creativity.  It's called 'Spring Fling' and it's so new it hasn't been released yet!

This beautiful green yarn with rainbow donegal flecks is by Colourful Creativity.  It's called 'Spring Fling' and it's so new it hasn't been released yet!

This sock was worked toe up, but that's ok, because a toe is a toe and they look the same whether they're worked toe up or cuff down.  The first thing I did was insert a lifeline where I wanted to restart the toe.  I used sock yarn in a contrasting colour and a darning needle to weave the lifeline through each stitch.

 The blue yarn is my lifeline. 

The blue yarn is my lifeline. 

Next, I took a deep breath (or 5) and a sip of wine (or 3) and then I cut the foot below the lifeline.  

 cutting one's knitting is always an anxious moment...

cutting one's knitting is always an anxious moment...

Then I breathed deeply, reassured myself that it would be ok and proceeded to pick out all the little bits of yarn that were left from the cutting.   Then I put the stitches back on the needles. 

 It looks like nothing happened! 

It looks like nothing happened! 

I reverse engineered my toe to work it from the cuff down instead of the toe up (which was how I had written it) and pretty soon I had a complete sock with correct foot length...

 Ta Da....

Ta Da....

It still needs to be blocked and have the ends woven in, but it looks much better than it did with a super long foot.  Look at those gussets!  I love them - they are pretty much the entire point of this sock design.  

This surgery would have worked for lengthening the foot too.  Or replacing a worn out toe.  Or changing the type of toe construction.  Or deciding to do the toe in a contrasting colour.  There are lots of circumstances that might see you having to surgically remove a toe on a sock and I hope this helps you get through it!  

Happy Knitting! 

Why Socks Are The Perfect Knitting Project

Chances are if you're reading my blog you're already a keen sock knitter, and if that's the case, pass this post on to a knitter who hasn't discovered the joy of socks yet.  On the off chance that you aren’t already an avid sock knitter who always has at least one sock project on the go, today I’m going to convince you!

 

Why Socks Are The Perfect (2).png

Socks are portable

Socks are small and fit in most bags and purses which makes them the perfect project for knitting on the go. 

They're easy to keep track of

It's so easy to pick up a sock and knit a couple of rows or even just a few stitches and then put it down again and not lose your place.  This makes socks ideal for knitting in social situations, in the car (when you're not the driver), or in a waiting room. 

Socks are (relatively) inexpensive

Socks are (usually) a one skein project, which makes them less of an investment than a multi-skein project.  Sock yarns are available in many price points which means there is usually an affordable sock yarn for most knitters. 

All feet need socks

Chances are if you have feet you will need socks at some point.  Even in warmer climates people like to wear socks around the house, on chilly evenings, or when they travel to cooler climates.  At some point in their lives, all feet need socks. 

Learn new techniques

Socks provide a great opportunity to learn new techniques on a small scale.  If you want to try a technique for the first time, socks are a great way to learn it, and figure out how you feel about it without making a sweater size commitment to the new technique.  

Minimal purling

Socks are worked in the round, so there are no purl rows to create the stockinette fabric.  I personally don't mind purling, but I know some knitters would rather avoid it and socks are a great way to minimize purl rows.  

Instant gratification

Socks aren't instant (the average mid-calf single sock takes 10-15 hours to complete depending on pattern stitch, foot length, and gauge), but progress is quick enough that there are definitely satisfying moments: cuffs are quick, heel turns will always make you feel like you've done something slightly magical, and toes are pretty fast.  

Socks are customizable

Sock patterns can be modified to accommodate almost any sensitivity or foot issue.  I wrote a post about it here.  

They make great gifts

Who doesn't love a pair of lovingly crafted, customized, hand knit socks?  With personalized sock wrappers?  You can find some gift wrappers for socks here.  

Have I convinced you yet?  I can keep going with all the reasons that socks are the perfect knitting project.  Let me know why you think socks are the perfect knitting project.  

Happy Knitting

 

How To Knit Socks For Sensitive Feet

Disclaimer: I am not a medical professional and this post is not intended to replace medical advice.  If you require medical advice seek the advice of a medical professional.  

sensitive feet.png

One of the benefits of hand knit socks is the ability to customize them to accommodate the wearer's taste, size and sensitivities.  Nothing feels better than a pair of socks made especially for your unique feet.  Once you've knit a few pairs of socks and you're comfortable with sock knitting, you'll be ready to modify patterns to get just the right socks for the feet you're knitting for.  Here are the most common modifications I find myself recommending to knitters who are knitting for sensitive feet:

The Cuff and Leg

  • Use a ribbing pattern on the cuff as well as the front and back of the leg.  Ribbing is stretchy and will accommodate swelling in the calf and upper ankle area. My personal preference is 2x2 or 3x2 ribbing but any ribbing that fits your stitch count will work.  
  • If socks on the leg are uncomfortable, skip the leg and make ankle socks; start the heel immediately after the cuff. 

The Heel

  • A heel flap and gussets is the most accommodating heel construction for a high instep (in fact it accommodates most foot anatomies well). 
  • A short row heel is comfortable for flatter feet.  
  • If swelling in the heel and ankle area is an issue, a roomy heel like the fleegle/strong heel is slightly less structured than a traditional heel flap and gussets and will allow for some swelling without becoming too snug. 
  • Short rows can be added to the sides of a short row heel to make the heel a bit roomier and allow for swelling. 
  • If the bottom of the heel (the part that touches the floor) is sensitive, consider working the heel turn in reverse stockinette so that the purl bumps are on the outside of the sock and the smooth knit side is against the skin. 

Instep

  • Continue the ribbing pattern from the leg onto the top of the foot to allow for swelling throughout the day. 

Sole

  • Some people are sensitive to purl bumps on the bottom of their feet.  The easiest way to solve this is to work the sole of the foot in reverse stockinette (purl every round) so that the purl bumps are on the outside of the sock and the smooth knit side is against the skin.  

  • For feet that are sensitive to purl bumps and/or require more cushion, work the sole of the foot in slip stitch stockinette (see chart below) this will eliminate the purl bumps and create a double knit, squishy fabric.  The row gauge on the sole of the foot will be shorter than the row gauge on the top of the foot, but this can be overcome by using a few carefully placed short rows.  My talented friend, Jo Torr has a great post about using short rows on the sole of the foot.  You can find it here.  

 Slip Stitch Stockinette is great for a squishy sole or to avoid the discomfort of purl bumps against the skin.

Slip Stitch Stockinette is great for a squishy sole or to avoid the discomfort of purl bumps against the skin.

Toe

  • For wide toes, a rounded toe is best
  • For narrow toes, a wedge toe is best
  • For toes that are sensitive to seams, ending with Kitchener stitch eliminates the seam and so does working toe up.
  • For toes that are sensitive to the lines of increases/decreases along either edge of the toe, a star toe eliminates these lines and spreads the increases/decreases throughout the toe. 
  • Anatomical toes (working the increases/decreases all on one side) are comfortable for toes that have a very prominent angle from the big toe to the little toe.  

I hope this gives you some ideas of ways to modify socks when you're knitting for sensitive feet.  Are there any modifications that you find helpful that I've missed?  Let us know in the comments. 

 

A Spring Gift For You...

So, January felt like it was 8,764 days long but March is flying by.  Time is weird. Can you believe that spring is less than a week away? (unless you’re reading this from the southern hemisphere, then fall is less than a week away).

More sunlight and warmer days mean it’s time to move the knitting outside.  It means that we can knit by sunlight well into the evenings (thereby soaking up vitamin D which is good for our health - another reason knitting is good for you!).  

Every season is knitting season and every season can be hand-knit-gift-season if you want it to be.  

If you’re planning to give the gift of socks this spring, or washcloths, fingerless mitts, hats, basically any smallish knitted items, I’ve made some cute spring themed knitting wrappers for you.  You can download them here.

Happy Knitting!

 


In Other News...

Caffeine Cowl has been released and is 20% off  until March 19th (No Coupon Code Required! OR purchase The Caffeine Collection at 25% off.

Caffeine Cowl is the 4th and final pattern in The Caffeine Collection . This is one of my absolute favourite stitch patterns; 4 rounds of knits and purls followed by 2 rounds of pattern stitch (to keep it interesting) result in a beautiful, textured, squishy fabric that looks great in solid, tonal, or variegated yarns. 

New Pattern Alert! And A 70th (!) Pattern Celebration...

Fingerless mitts are my winter-hand-accessory-of-choice.  On milder winter days I wear them on their own and on chillier days I wear them over a plain pair of gloves in a complementary colour (which is usually black for me).  My fingerless mitten wardrobe needed some updating...and here we are!

Caffeine Fingerless Mitts is the 3rd pattern to be released in the Caffeine Collection . This is one of my absolute favourite stitch patterns to knit! It’s mostly knits and purls for 4 rows followed by 2 rows of pattern work (to keep it interesting) and the result is a beautiful, squishy fabric that looks great on any accessory! 

Caffeine Mitts start with a tubular cast on (or your cast on of choice) a 1x1 rib stitch on the cuff that continues through the thumb gusset and thumb. The Caffeine stitch pattern is worked on the front and back of the hand and the mitt ends with an icord bind off.

Links to video tutorials for both the Caffeine stitch pattern and icord bind off are included with the pattern. 

To celebrate recently reaching the milestone of releasing my 70th pattern, (I was totally shocked last week when I realized this)  you can download Caffeine Fingerless Mitts with a 50% discount when you purchase any other pattern in my Ravelry store. Simply put both patterns in your cart and use the coupon code: celebrate at checkout. (or you can purchase it on it's own with a 20% discount and no coupon code required) until Monday March 12th! 

 

 

In Other News...

It’s time for a Knit Along!

For everyone who picked up a copy of Sock by Numbers: we’ll be having a Sock By Numbers KAL (#SBNKAL) from March 12th to March 31st in the #SockStar Facebook group.

This way we can help and support each other through the math - once you’ve made one sock, you’ll be good to go and be able to make socks with any yarn, any gauge, needle, for any size foot. If you haven’t purchased the pattern yet, it's available with a 20% discount using the coupon code: SBNKAL until March 12th. Click here to download it. 

Some of my Fibre friends have donated some awesome prizes! You can find more info in the  #SockStar Facebook Group here.

Happy Knitting! 

 


In Other News...

Caffeine Cowl was released yesterday!  Caffeine Cowl is the 4th and final pattern in The Caffeine Collection . This is one of my absolute favourite stitch patterns; 4 rounds of knits and purls followed by 2 rounds of pattern stitch (to keep it interesting) result in a beautiful, textured, squishy fabric that looks great in solid, tonal, or variegated yarns.

You can download Caffeine Cowl with a 20% discount (no coupon code required) until Monday March 19th.  You can download the pattern here.  

A New Pattern And A Recipe!

Ahlie has been released into the world...

Ahlie socks are quirky and fun!  The socks mirror each other with an easy to memorize 2 round stitch pattern on the front and back of both legs and on the top of the foot.  The sock is worked from the cuff down with an eye of partridge heel flap, french heel, and finishes with a star toe that doesn’t fight with the bias of the fabric.

The pattern is graded for 4 circumferences and foot length is customizable.

The sample is knit with Seawall Fibres Quartz Socks in 'Apatite'.  

I'm also releasing Sock By Numbers today! 

Sock By Numbers isn’t a pattern, it’s a recipe to create a cuff down sock using any yarn, any needles, any gauge.  This pattern starts with a ribbed cuff, features a heel flap and gussets and ends with a wedge toe that is grafted closed using Kitchener stitch.

This is not a beginner recipe.  Some knowledge of sock anatomy is required and spoiler alert: this recipe has a lot of math!

If doing math old school (longhand) isn’t your thing, the pattern includes access to a soooper seeekrit spreadsheet on my website to help you with the math. 

Ahlie and Sock By Numbers are both available with a 20% discount (no coupon code required) OR if you purchase Ahlie and Sock By Numbers together you will receive a 30% discount on both patterns with the coupon code: socks

The Caffeine Collection is now available for pre-order!  This is my first accessory collection, and I'm super excited! If you purchase the collection before March 1st, you’ll get all 4 patterns for $14! The Caffeine sock pattern will be added to your library immediately and then Caffeine Hat, Caffeine Mitts, and Caffeine Cowl will automagically be added to your library as they are released on March 1st, 8th, and 15th. The ebook price will increase as each pattern is released. You can find more information by clicking here. 

If you’ve previously purchased Caffeine socks, the ebook price will be adjusted accordingly.

Happy Knitting! 

To Match Or Not To Match?

matching socks.jpeg

Several weeks ago I posted in my Facebook Group and on Instagram asking sock knitters if they prefer hand knit socks to be identical twins or fraternal twins?

They’re sisters, not twins (or fraternal twins, as some knitters like to call their slightly mismatched socks). This doesn’t bother me at all. Having each sock be slightly different, yet at the same time feel the same makes them interesting to me. Also, I learned a long time ago that striving for perfection in life isn’t great for my mental health. How do you feel about matching socks? Do you prefer them identical or fraternal?

These socks are sisters, not twins (or fraternal twins, as some knitters like to call their slightly mismatched socks). This doesn’t bother me at all. Having each sock be slightly different, yet at the same time feel the same makes them interesting to me, and gives them character. Also, I learned a long time ago that striving for perfection in life isn’t great for my mental health. How do you feel about matching socks? Do you prefer them identical or fraternal?

Say Hello To Pin Up Socks

Pin Up Socks has been released into the world...

Pin Up has been released! This design is inspired by the iconic 1943 pin up photo of Bettie Grable . This sock design looks just as gorgeous viewed from the back as it does from the front.

Pin Up is worked from the cuff down and features a unique yet deceptively simple split heel construction and star toe (read: no Kitchener stitch). Since most of the sock is stockinette, the pattern knits up remarkably quickly! The pattern is graded for 5 circumferences and the foot length is customizable. The pattern is both written and charted and includes a schematic. The yarn is by a local (to me) dyer called WN Yarns and the colourway is 'Deeper Desert Green'.

You can download Pin Up with a 20% discount (no coupon code required!) until Monday February 12th, 2018.  

Happy Knitting! 

Strickplaner 2018 Review

Disclaimer:  All opinions are my own.  I have not received any financial compensation in exchange for this review.  I purchased this product with my own money for my own use. This is not a sponsored post. 

A few weeks ago I posted a photo of my 2018 Strickplaner on social media and suggested that I could do a review of the planner.  The response was overwhelming, so I've filmed a quick video of the planner and how I use it.  Spoiler alert: I love this planner and will definitely be ordering one for 2019!  Enjoy the review! 

It's A 2 Socks Kind Of Day...

Introducing Holey Moley...

Holey Moley is a great beginner sock pattern that uses a simple stitch pattern that looks more
difficult than it actually is! Holey Moley is worked from the toe up and features a rounded toe and star heel.

The yarn is scrumptious!  It's by Sea Turtle Fiber Arts in their Ridley Sock base and the colour is 'Meadow'

Also Introducing...

 

Slipped stitches and dropped stitches play beautifully with variegated yarn! The stitch pattern used in Inside Out socks is easy to memorize and results in a beautifully textured fabric that doesn’t compete with the short colour changes in variegated yarns.


This sock is worked cuff down with a reverse stockinette short row heel, princess sole and reverse stockinette toe. This sock has the added feature of being reversible - 2 pairs of socks in 1!

Again, the yarn is absolutely lovely and is by Sea Turtle Fiber Arts in their Ridley Sock base and the colour is 'Smashed'. 

Both socks are are 20% off (no coupon code required) until Monday January 29th OR if you put both Inside Out and Holey Moley in your cart and use the coupon code: 2socks you'll get 30% off of both patterns! 

Do you celebrate Valentine's Day? If you start now, you can knit up a pair of Heart & Sole socks in time for the big day.  The pattern is 20% off (no coupon code required) until this Friday.  This is a mosaic pattern which means you only use one colour at a time and have no pesky floats to worry about. 

Happy Knitting! 

Are Knitting And Stashing Two Separate Hobbies?

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A few months ago I posted this meme on my Instagram feed and quickly received many comments from knitters saying they consider knitting and yarn collecting to be 2 separate but related hobbies.  I hadn't considered it until I saw this meme, but I think it's true.  

In addition to skeins that have projects planned for them, I have lots of yarn that (as of right now) I have no plans for at all, other than to admire it, pet it occasionally, and stash it. 

I have souvenir yarn from trips I've taken, one of a kind skeins that were too pretty not to bring home, limited edition and discontinued colourways, unique fibres and fibre blends, and yarns from various fibre festivals I've attended.  This definitely sounds like a collection apart from a stash of yarn to be knit, doesn't it?   (As an aside,  it's amazing how quickly I can develop an emotional attachment to a skein of yarn.  Seriously). 

I'm definitely both a knitter and a yarn collector.  Do you consider your stash to be part of your knitting hobby or a separate hobby altogether?

First Pattern Release Of 2018!

Happy New Year!  

Baker Lake has been released into the world...


This sock was designed as the Ontario stop on the XCC Roadtrip KAL hosted by Hilori's Magical Yarnorium. Baker Lake is the (somewhat disputed) geographic centre of Canada and seemed like the perfect theme for a Cross Canada Knitalong!
 


Baker Lake is worked cuff down with a cable panel down the front and back centre of the sock. The cable panels are connected by smaller lines of twisted and slipped stitches. The pattern uses a heel flap and gussets and ends with a rounded toe.

The pattern is graded for 3 circumferences and the foot length is customizable.

The lovely yarn is by Hilori's Magical Yarnorium in the Done Gal base and the colourway is 'Vicserion'.  

You can download Baker Lake with a 20% discount until Monday January 8th, 2018 - no coupon code required! 
 

 

Happy Knitting!