Do You Wear Your Heart On Your Feet? ❤️👣

Heart & Sole is 20% off until Thursday February 14th, 2019 (no coupon code required).

A knitterly alternative to wearing your heart on your sleeve, you can express your love for hand knit socks, yarn, and someone special with this cozy, fun sock pattern that uses mosaic knitting to create heart motifs along the front and back leg of the socks.

Slipped stitches are used to create the heart motifs, which means there is no stranded colour work and each row is knit using only one colour.

The heel is added after the rest of the sock is finished so the alternating stripe pattern is not interrupted. Instructions are included for 3 circumferences, and the foot length is customizable. You can find Heart & Sole here.



When you love a dog, you have a lot of very good days and one very bad day.
— W. Bruce Cameron

This past week has been a difficult one at chez Gervais, our sweet Maggie passed away on Saturday. I feel like I’ve lost a soul mate and the light in the world is a little bit dimmer right now. She was the best companion and an amazing friend. I felt the need to memorialize her on my website. Sleep well, Maggie. Rest in peace.

New Pattern Release: Advanced Edition!

Equanimity has been released into the world…

Equanimity is the ability to remain calm and composed while under stress.

Manifesting this design from a picture in my head to a finished pair of socks with a pattern has tested my equanimity more than any other sock I’ve designed.

Equanimity was originally written as a stranded colour work pattern, but the test knitters and myself really weren't enjoying catching floats on the purl rows and the sample knitter became so frustrated that she packed up and delivered a ½ finished sock to my doorstep late on a cold November night. As one test knitter gently said, "This pattern is not for the faint of heart." It was widely agreed that the design was great and a pattern needed to exist for it, but it wasn't working as written.  

So, since Equanimity was not achieving my goals which are to always create designs and write patterns that you love, allow you to express your creativity, help you to relax with a hobby that soothes your soul, and results in a beautiful, finished pair of socks, I halted the test knit and went back to the drawing board (in this case the drawing board is graph paper). I re-worked the pattern to use mosaic knitting because more slipped stitches means fewer long floats (and the frustration they can cause) on purl rows, and working with one colour on each round is more relaxing than working with 2 colours on each round, and the pattern still results in a beautiful finished pair of socks. 

You can download Equanimity with a 20% discount until Monday January 28th, 2019 - no coupon code required. You can find the pattern here.


In Other News…

If you're a fan of the Outlander (the books, the seires, or both), then you'll love this blog post by The Loopy Ewe that features Outlander inspired knits.  I'm proud and honoured that Sassenach was chosen as one of the featured patterns.  The patterns are lovely, and Sassenach is in great company.  

My friend and fellow designer, Lindsay, featured an interview with me on her blog recently.  Lindsay is the super talented, environmentally conscious knitwear designer behind the Knit Eco Chic brand and I'm thrilled to make an appearance on her website.  If you'd like to learn more about me and see some photos of my pets, you can find the blog post here. Those 2 troublemakers kitties in the above photo are our cats, Sammy and Dean.  

A Fun Knitting Game

I posted this knitting game on social media earlier this week and it was so much fun! Give yourself 1 point for each thing you have NOT done. I’ll post a photo of my results below the photo of the game!

Give yourself 1 point for each thing you have   NOT   done.

Give yourself 1 point for each thing you have NOT done.

I got 4 points. Here are the 4 things I have not done:

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What was your score?

Hand Care For Knitters

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*Disclaimer - I am not a healthcare professional.  This post is not intended to replace medical advice.  This is my own personal experience and experiences that have been shared with me by others.  If you have a knitting related injury/strain/pain you should seek the advice of a qualified medical professional.

Now that Giftmas is less than 2 months away, and so many of us are racing against a gift knitting deadline, this is your annual reminder to take care of your hands this Giftmas knitting season!  For many of us, this is our busy season as we knit as much as possible finish all the gifts as before the clock strikes midnight on the 24th.  

Here are some strategies to help you make sure that you and your hands survive December.  There's also a cool infographic at the bottom of this post that demonstrates some helpful stretching techniques:  

  • Take a break: Knitting is meditative, I get it!  When I’m in the zone I can contentedly knit along for hours on end, which usually results in a sore hand and wrist the next day.  Remember to mindfully take breaks, walk away and find something else to do.  Sometimes I knit by the inch (as in I will knit a certain number of inches then take a break), sometimes I knit with a time limit (as in I will change tasks in one hour, or after this episode or podcast).

  • Stretch:  Stretching helps.  I find stretching to be especially effective when I do it in the evening or at bedtime since everything seems to seize up while I sleep.  

  • Warm water: Having a shower, a bath or even just washing some dishes in warm water seems to to help the pain and stiffness quite a bit.  

  • Wear a Brace: I hate this one, but it helps.  I have a brace for my right hand that restricts the range of motion and essentially forces me to rest.  It's a bitch to knit in, so I don't knit when I wear it, but that's probably the point.

  • Medication: I occasionally take anti-inflammatory medication to help with the discomfort.  Not very often though as I do not want to become dependent on them.  

Here are some things that other knitters have told me work for them:

  • Change your knitting style: I'm not bi-stitchual.  I only knit one way - I call it modified English style - the yarn is in my right hand, but instead of throwing it over the needle, I flick it with my index finger.  I have tried to switch to continental, but it doesn't work for me.  I'm set in my ways.  I envy knitters who can alternate easily between English and Continental.  If you try this, be careful about doing it in the middle of a project as your tension may change and so might your gauge.  

  • Change Crafts:  If you are multi-craftual, you can give your hands and wrists a break by focusing on your other crafts for a while.  Crocheting, sewing, writing, drawing, needlepoint, cross-stitch, spinning, dyeing...the fibre community is full of so many talented, multi-craftual people - we really are an amazing bunch of creative talents!

  • Avoidance: If there is a specific part of knitting that triggers your pain, avoid it.  Certain needles antagonize my pain.  I love to knit socks on 9 inch circular needles, but will have wrist pain for days afterwards.  If you have a trigger, try to avoid it.  

Do you have any tips or tricks for keeping your hands pain-free while you knit?  Let us know! 

2019 Strickplaner Review & Comparison

As promised, here is a review of the 2019 Strickplaner. I’ve compared it to the 2018 Strickplaner, and I love the 2019 edition more than the 2018 edition. You can see the review of the 2018 Strickplaner here. This video features one of our cats, Sammy, who loves to be the centre of attention and is hopefully not too distracting.

The opinions expressed in this review are my own. I purchased this planner with my own money and I am not receiving any consideration, financial or otherwise, in exchange for this review. When I love something I want to spread the love!