How To Embroider Lazy Daisies - A Photo Tutorial

My sock pattern, Lazy Daisy uses (really easy) chain stitch embroidery to add the daisies to the socks after they have been knit.




















Chain stitch embroidery is easy, quick, and a handy skill to have in your arsenal.  I have used it to embroider numbers on our advent calendar (24 miniature stockings), and names on knitted items.

This is a close up of a finished daisy:



















These fun little Daisies are a great way to use up otherwise-useless bits of scrap yarn or embroidery floss.  I used leftover sockyarn from socks gone-by.  I would use yarn the same weight or lighter than the yarn you used to create the fabric you are embroidering.  It may work with heavier yarn, but I have not tried it so I don't know for sure.  If you try to embroider in a heavier yarn weight, I would love to hear how it works out.

Here is what you will need to make lazy daisies:

  • scrap yarn
  • scissors
  • tapestry needle








Step one: Thread your tapestry needle with about 2 feet/ 60 centimetres of scrap yarn.   Bring the yarn up through the wrong side of the fabric where you would like the centre of your daisy to be.  Like this:















Step two: Bring your needle back down into the fabric as close as possible to where you brought it out and bring it out again where you want the outer edge of your first daisy petal to go.  Like this:












Step three: wrap the working yarn/embroidery floss around and under the tip of your needle to form a loop.  Like this:












Step four: pull your needle and yarn through the loop - not too tight or you will close the petal.  Like this: 












Step five: bring your needle through to the wrong side of your fabric on the outside of, but as close as possible to the outer edge of the petal.  This will create a little loop that will anchor the petal in place. Like this:   



















Step six: bring your needle up from the wrong side of your fabric as close to the centre of your daisy as possible and repeat these steps for the next petal












After the daisy is complete I tie both ends into a knot on the wrong side.  Not the most glamourous finishing technique I could use, but who will be looking inside my socks?  My daisies had 5 or 6 petals, but you can use as many or as few  petals as you want.  Embroidered daisies are as close to gardening as I ever get.  If you have any questions, please contact me either by leaving a comment on this tutorial or by email at DanaGervaisDesigns at Bell dot net.