Sock Surgery 101: How To Fix Foot Length

This crumply, unblocked, unwoven mess is a design I'm working on.  When it's blocked and woven, it will be spectacular (especially the gussets!) but right now it's a hot mess.  I got carried away watching Netflix and working the foot at the same time and now the foot is about 2 inches too long, so today I'm going to show you how I fixed it.  

This beautiful green yarn with rainbow donegal flecks is by Colourful Creativity.  It's called 'Spring Fling' and it's so new it hasn't been released yet!

This beautiful green yarn with rainbow donegal flecks is by Colourful Creativity.  It's called 'Spring Fling' and it's so new it hasn't been released yet!

This sock was worked toe up, but that's ok, because a toe is a toe and they look the same whether they're worked toe up or cuff down.  The first thing I did was insert a lifeline where I wanted to restart the toe.  I used sock yarn in a contrasting colour and a darning needle to weave the lifeline through each stitch.

The blue yarn is my lifeline. 

The blue yarn is my lifeline. 

Next, I took a deep breath (or 5) and a sip of wine (or 3) and then I cut the foot below the lifeline.  

cutting one's knitting is always an anxious moment...

cutting one's knitting is always an anxious moment...

Then I breathed deeply, reassured myself that it would be ok and proceeded to pick out all the little bits of yarn that were left from the cutting.   Then I put the stitches back on the needles. 

It looks like nothing happened! 

It looks like nothing happened! 

I reverse engineered my toe to work it from the cuff down instead of the toe up (which was how I had written it) and pretty soon I had a complete sock with correct foot length...

Ta Da....

Ta Da....

It still needs to be blocked and have the ends woven in, but it looks much better than it did with a super long foot.  Look at those gussets!  I love them - they are pretty much the entire point of this sock design.  

This surgery would have worked for lengthening the foot too.  Or replacing a worn out toe.  Or changing the type of toe construction.  Or deciding to do the toe in a contrasting colour.  There are lots of circumstances that might see you having to surgically remove a toe on a sock and I hope this helps you get through it!  

Happy Knitting! 

Why Socks Are The Perfect Knitting Project

Chances are if you're reading my blog you're already a keen sock knitter, and if that's the case, pass this post on to a knitter who hasn't discovered the joy of socks yet.  On the off chance that you aren’t already an avid sock knitter who always has at least one sock project on the go, today I’m going to convince you!

 

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Socks are portable

Socks are small and fit in most bags and purses which makes them the perfect project for knitting on the go. 

They're easy to keep track of

It's so easy to pick up a sock and knit a couple of rows or even just a few stitches and then put it down again and not lose your place.  This makes socks ideal for knitting in social situations, in the car (when you're not the driver), or in a waiting room. 

Socks are (relatively) inexpensive

Socks are (usually) a one skein project, which makes them less of an investment than a multi-skein project.  Sock yarns are available in many price points which means there is usually an affordable sock yarn for most knitters. 

All feet need socks

Chances are if you have feet you will need socks at some point.  Even in warmer climates people like to wear socks around the house, on chilly evenings, or when they travel to cooler climates.  At some point in their lives, all feet need socks. 

Learn new techniques

Socks provide a great opportunity to learn new techniques on a small scale.  If you want to try a technique for the first time, socks are a great way to learn it, and figure out how you feel about it without making a sweater size commitment to the new technique.  

Minimal purling

Socks are worked in the round, so there are no purl rows to create the stockinette fabric.  I personally don't mind purling, but I know some knitters would rather avoid it and socks are a great way to minimize purl rows.  

Instant gratification

Socks aren't instant (the average mid-calf single sock takes 10-15 hours to complete depending on pattern stitch, foot length, and gauge), but progress is quick enough that there are definitely satisfying moments: cuffs are quick, heel turns will always make you feel like you've done something slightly magical, and toes are pretty fast.  

Socks are customizable

Sock patterns can be modified to accommodate almost any sensitivity or foot issue.  I wrote a post about it here.  

They make great gifts

Who doesn't love a pair of lovingly crafted, customized, hand knit socks?  With personalized sock wrappers?  You can find some gift wrappers for socks here.  

Have I convinced you yet?  I can keep going with all the reasons that socks are the perfect knitting project.  Let me know why you think socks are the perfect knitting project.  

Happy Knitting

 

How To Knit Socks For Sensitive Feet

Disclaimer: I am not a medical professional and this post is not intended to replace medical advice.  If you require medical advice seek the advice of a medical professional.  

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One of the benefits of hand knit socks is the ability to customize them to accommodate the wearer's taste, size and sensitivities.  Nothing feels better than a pair of socks made especially for your unique feet.  Once you've knit a few pairs of socks and you're comfortable with sock knitting, you'll be ready to modify patterns to get just the right socks for the feet you're knitting for.  Here are the most common modifications I find myself recommending to knitters who are knitting for sensitive feet:

The Cuff and Leg

  • Use a ribbing pattern on the cuff as well as the front and back of the leg.  Ribbing is stretchy and will accommodate swelling in the calf and upper ankle area. My personal preference is 2x2 or 3x2 ribbing but any ribbing that fits your stitch count will work.  
  • If socks on the leg are uncomfortable, skip the leg and make ankle socks; start the heel immediately after the cuff. 

The Heel

  • A heel flap and gussets is the most accommodating heel construction for a high instep (in fact it accommodates most foot anatomies well). 
  • A short row heel is comfortable for flatter feet.  
  • If swelling in the heel and ankle area is an issue, a roomy heel like the fleegle/strong heel is slightly less structured than a traditional heel flap and gussets and will allow for some swelling without becoming too snug. 
  • Short rows can be added to the sides of a short row heel to make the heel a bit roomier and allow for swelling. 
  • If the bottom of the heel (the part that touches the floor) is sensitive, consider working the heel turn in reverse stockinette so that the purl bumps are on the outside of the sock and the smooth knit side is against the skin. 

Instep

  • Continue the ribbing pattern from the leg onto the top of the foot to allow for swelling throughout the day. 

Sole

  • Some people are sensitive to purl bumps on the bottom of their feet.  The easiest way to solve this is to work the sole of the foot in reverse stockinette (purl every round) so that the purl bumps are on the outside of the sock and the smooth knit side is against the skin.  

  • For feet that are sensitive to purl bumps and/or require more cushion, work the sole of the foot in slip stitch stockinette (see chart below) this will eliminate the purl bumps and create a double knit, squishy fabric.  The row gauge on the sole of the foot will be shorter than the row gauge on the top of the foot, but this can be overcome by using a few carefully placed short rows.  My talented friend, Jo Torr has a great post about using short rows on the sole of the foot.  You can find it here.  

Slip Stitch Stockinette is great for a squishy sole or to avoid the discomfort of purl bumps against the skin.

Slip Stitch Stockinette is great for a squishy sole or to avoid the discomfort of purl bumps against the skin.

Toe

  • For wide toes, a rounded toe is best
  • For narrow toes, a wedge toe is best
  • For toes that are sensitive to seams, ending with Kitchener stitch eliminates the seam and so does working toe up.
  • For toes that are sensitive to the lines of increases/decreases along either edge of the toe, a star toe eliminates these lines and spreads the increases/decreases throughout the toe. 
  • Anatomical toes (working the increases/decreases all on one side) are comfortable for toes that have a very prominent angle from the big toe to the little toe.  

I hope this gives you some ideas of ways to modify socks when you're knitting for sensitive feet.  Are there any modifications that you find helpful that I've missed?  Let us know in the comments. 

 

A Spring Gift For You...

So, January felt like it was 8,764 days long but March is flying by.  Time is weird. Can you believe that spring is less than a week away? (unless you’re reading this from the southern hemisphere, then fall is less than a week away).

More sunlight and warmer days mean it’s time to move the knitting outside.  It means that we can knit by sunlight well into the evenings (thereby soaking up vitamin D which is good for our health - another reason knitting is good for you!).  

Every season is knitting season and every season can be hand-knit-gift-season if you want it to be.  

If you’re planning to give the gift of socks this spring, or washcloths, fingerless mitts, hats, basically any smallish knitted items, I’ve made some cute spring themed knitting wrappers for you.  You can download them here.

Happy Knitting!

 


In Other News...

Caffeine Cowl has been released and is 20% off  until March 19th (No Coupon Code Required! OR purchase The Caffeine Collection at 25% off.

Caffeine Cowl is the 4th and final pattern in The Caffeine Collection . This is one of my absolute favourite stitch patterns; 4 rounds of knits and purls followed by 2 rounds of pattern stitch (to keep it interesting) result in a beautiful, textured, squishy fabric that looks great in solid, tonal, or variegated yarns. 

New Pattern Alert! And A 70th (!) Pattern Celebration...

Fingerless mitts are my winter-hand-accessory-of-choice.  On milder winter days I wear them on their own and on chillier days I wear them over a plain pair of gloves in a complementary colour (which is usually black for me).  My fingerless mitten wardrobe needed some updating...and here we are!

Caffeine Fingerless Mitts is the 3rd pattern to be released in the Caffeine Collection . This is one of my absolute favourite stitch patterns to knit! It’s mostly knits and purls for 4 rows followed by 2 rows of pattern work (to keep it interesting) and the result is a beautiful, squishy fabric that looks great on any accessory! 

Caffeine Mitts start with a tubular cast on (or your cast on of choice) a 1x1 rib stitch on the cuff that continues through the thumb gusset and thumb. The Caffeine stitch pattern is worked on the front and back of the hand and the mitt ends with an icord bind off.

Links to video tutorials for both the Caffeine stitch pattern and icord bind off are included with the pattern. 

To celebrate recently reaching the milestone of releasing my 70th pattern, (I was totally shocked last week when I realized this)  you can download Caffeine Fingerless Mitts with a 50% discount when you purchase any other pattern in my Ravelry store. Simply put both patterns in your cart and use the coupon code: celebrate at checkout. (or you can purchase it on it's own with a 20% discount and no coupon code required) until Monday March 12th! 

 

 

In Other News...

It’s time for a Knit Along!

For everyone who picked up a copy of Sock by Numbers: we’ll be having a Sock By Numbers KAL (#SBNKAL) from March 12th to March 31st in the #SockStar Facebook group.

This way we can help and support each other through the math - once you’ve made one sock, you’ll be good to go and be able to make socks with any yarn, any gauge, needle, for any size foot. If you haven’t purchased the pattern yet, it's available with a 20% discount using the coupon code: SBNKAL until March 12th. Click here to download it. 

Some of my Fibre friends have donated some awesome prizes! You can find more info in the  #SockStar Facebook Group here.

Happy Knitting! 

 


In Other News...

Caffeine Cowl was released yesterday!  Caffeine Cowl is the 4th and final pattern in The Caffeine Collection . This is one of my absolute favourite stitch patterns; 4 rounds of knits and purls followed by 2 rounds of pattern stitch (to keep it interesting) result in a beautiful, textured, squishy fabric that looks great in solid, tonal, or variegated yarns.

You can download Caffeine Cowl with a 20% discount (no coupon code required) until Monday March 19th.  You can download the pattern here.  

A New Pattern And A Recipe!

Ahlie has been released into the world...

Ahlie socks are quirky and fun!  The socks mirror each other with an easy to memorize 2 round stitch pattern on the front and back of both legs and on the top of the foot.  The sock is worked from the cuff down with an eye of partridge heel flap, french heel, and finishes with a star toe that doesn’t fight with the bias of the fabric.

The pattern is graded for 4 circumferences and foot length is customizable.

The sample is knit with Seawall Fibres Quartz Socks in 'Apatite'.  

I'm also releasing Sock By Numbers today! 

Sock By Numbers isn’t a pattern, it’s a recipe to create a cuff down sock using any yarn, any needles, any gauge.  This pattern starts with a ribbed cuff, features a heel flap and gussets and ends with a wedge toe that is grafted closed using Kitchener stitch.

This is not a beginner recipe.  Some knowledge of sock anatomy is required and spoiler alert: this recipe has a lot of math!

If doing math old school (longhand) isn’t your thing, the pattern includes access to a soooper seeekrit spreadsheet on my website to help you with the math. 

Ahlie and Sock By Numbers are both available with a 20% discount (no coupon code required) OR if you purchase Ahlie and Sock By Numbers together you will receive a 30% discount on both patterns with the coupon code: socks

The Caffeine Collection is now available for pre-order!  This is my first accessory collection, and I'm super excited! If you purchase the collection before March 1st, you’ll get all 4 patterns for $14! The Caffeine sock pattern will be added to your library immediately and then Caffeine Hat, Caffeine Mitts, and Caffeine Cowl will automagically be added to your library as they are released on March 1st, 8th, and 15th. The ebook price will increase as each pattern is released. You can find more information by clicking here. 

If you’ve previously purchased Caffeine socks, the ebook price will be adjusted accordingly.

Happy Knitting! 

To Match Or Not To Match?

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Several weeks ago I posted in my Facebook Group and on Instagram asking sock knitters if they prefer hand knit socks to be identical twins or fraternal twins?

They’re sisters, not twins (or fraternal twins, as some knitters like to call their slightly mismatched socks). This doesn’t bother me at all. Having each sock be slightly different, yet at the same time feel the same makes them interesting to me. Also, I learned a long time ago that striving for perfection in life isn’t great for my mental health. How do you feel about matching socks? Do you prefer them identical or fraternal?

These socks are sisters, not twins (or fraternal twins, as some knitters like to call their slightly mismatched socks). This doesn’t bother me at all. Having each sock be slightly different, yet at the same time feel the same makes them interesting to me, and gives them character. Also, I learned a long time ago that striving for perfection in life isn’t great for my mental health. How do you feel about matching socks? Do you prefer them identical or fraternal?

Say Hello To Pin Up Socks

Pin Up Socks has been released into the world...

Pin Up has been released! This design is inspired by the iconic 1943 pin up photo of Bettie Grable . This sock design looks just as gorgeous viewed from the back as it does from the front.

Pin Up is worked from the cuff down and features a unique yet deceptively simple split heel construction and star toe (read: no Kitchener stitch). Since most of the sock is stockinette, the pattern knits up remarkably quickly! The pattern is graded for 5 circumferences and the foot length is customizable. The pattern is both written and charted and includes a schematic. The yarn is by a local (to me) dyer called WN Yarns and the colourway is 'Deeper Desert Green'.

You can download Pin Up with a 20% discount (no coupon code required!) until Monday February 12th, 2018.  

Happy Knitting! 

Strickplaner 2018 Review

Disclaimer:  All opinions are my own.  I have not received any financial compensation in exchange for this review.  I purchased this product with my own money for my own use. This is not a sponsored post. 

A few weeks ago I posted a photo of my 2018 Strickplaner on social media and suggested that I could do a review of the planner.  The response was overwhelming, so I've filmed a quick video of the planner and how I use it.  Spoiler alert: I love this planner and will definitely be ordering one for 2019!  Enjoy the review! 

It's A 2 Socks Kind Of Day...

Introducing Holey Moley...

Holey Moley is a great beginner sock pattern that uses a simple stitch pattern that looks more
difficult than it actually is! Holey Moley is worked from the toe up and features a rounded toe and star heel.

The yarn is scrumptious!  It's by Sea Turtle Fiber Arts in their Ridley Sock base and the colour is 'Meadow'

Also Introducing...

 

Slipped stitches and dropped stitches play beautifully with variegated yarn! The stitch pattern used in Inside Out socks is easy to memorize and results in a beautifully textured fabric that doesn’t compete with the short colour changes in variegated yarns.


This sock is worked cuff down with a reverse stockinette short row heel, princess sole and reverse stockinette toe. This sock has the added feature of being reversible - 2 pairs of socks in 1!

Again, the yarn is absolutely lovely and is by Sea Turtle Fiber Arts in their Ridley Sock base and the colour is 'Smashed'. 

Both socks are are 20% off (no coupon code required) until Monday January 29th OR if you put both Inside Out and Holey Moley in your cart and use the coupon code: 2socks you'll get 30% off of both patterns! 

Do you celebrate Valentine's Day? If you start now, you can knit up a pair of Heart & Sole socks in time for the big day.  The pattern is 20% off (no coupon code required) until this Friday.  This is a mosaic pattern which means you only use one colour at a time and have no pesky floats to worry about. 

Happy Knitting! 

Are Knitting And Stashing Two Separate Hobbies?

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A few months ago I posted this meme on my Instagram feed and quickly received many comments from knitters saying they consider knitting and yarn collecting to be 2 separate but related hobbies.  I hadn't considered it until I saw this meme, but I think it's true.  

In addition to skeins that have projects planned for them, I have lots of yarn that (as of right now) I have no plans for at all, other than to admire it, pet it occasionally, and stash it. 

I have souvenir yarn from trips I've taken, one of a kind skeins that were too pretty not to bring home, limited edition and discontinued colourways, unique fibres and fibre blends, and yarns from various fibre festivals I've attended.  This definitely sounds like a collection apart from a stash of yarn to be knit, doesn't it?   (As an aside,  it's amazing how quickly I can develop an emotional attachment to a skein of yarn.  Seriously). 

I'm definitely both a knitter and a yarn collector.  Do you consider your stash to be part of your knitting hobby or a separate hobby altogether?

First Pattern Release Of 2018!

Happy New Year!  

Baker Lake has been released into the world...


This sock was designed as the Ontario stop on the XCC Roadtrip KAL hosted by Hilori's Magical Yarnorium. Baker Lake is the (somewhat disputed) geographic centre of Canada and seemed like the perfect theme for a Cross Canada Knitalong!
 


Baker Lake is worked cuff down with a cable panel down the front and back centre of the sock. The cable panels are connected by smaller lines of twisted and slipped stitches. The pattern uses a heel flap and gussets and ends with a rounded toe.

The pattern is graded for 3 circumferences and the foot length is customizable.

The lovely yarn is by Hilori's Magical Yarnorium in the Done Gal base and the colourway is 'Vicserion'.  

You can download Baker Lake with a 20% discount until Monday January 8th, 2018 - no coupon code required! 
 

 

Happy Knitting! 

2018 Knitting Goals and Resolutions

Do you know that goals and resolutions aren't the same thing?  It never occurred to me that they might be different, but It was recently brought to my attention that they are.  Goals have a measurable finish line (for example, a goal to knit a pair of socks) while a resolution is something with no end, something you want to incorporate into your life going forward (for example, a resolution to start each day with 30 minutes of quiet knitting time).  I'm more of a goal setter than a resolution setter.  I can't help it, I'm results oriented.  I get a big thrill from ticking things off of a to-do list.

I'm happy to report that I met all of my goals for 2017 (yay, me!).  Now I'm in the process of setting some goals for 2018.  There will be socks, of course!  Lots of socks!  Though I'd like to design some non-sock patterns, too.  There will also be a couple of more courses and challenges (fair isle, mosaic, and intarsia in the round are the most requested techniques).  There will be a socks-by-numbers-worksheet so knitters can knit a pair of socks with any yarn at any gauge (I've already started working in this one), hopefully a book, and I'm launching a new business geared to my fellow designers.  2018 will be a fun and exciting year!  

I didn't really set any resolutions for 2017, but for 2018, I'd like to start and end each day with some quiet knitting time.  I'd like to keep my office clean instead of letting it get so out of hand that it takes an entire weekend to sort out (which is how I manage it now).  

Do you set goals or resolutions? What are your knitting goals and resolutions for 2018?

 

New Pattern Alert!

Juniper has been released into the world...

Growing up we had a Juniper bush in front of our house, I loved the way the small bluish-purplish berries looked on a cold winter morning when they had a touch of hoar frost.

When Nicole (the talented dyer at The Spinnacle Fiber Arts) and I were discussing a winter-themed colourway, we talked about winter berries and both 'Night Frost' and Juniper were born.

Juniper is worked from the cuff down with an easy to memorize textured stitch pattern on the front and back of the leg. The textured pattern continues onto the heel flap and the top of the foot. The sock ends with a rounded toe that is grafted closed using Kitchener stitch.

The pattern is graded for 4 circumferences and the foot length is customizable. 

You can download Juniper with a 20% discount (no coupon code required) until Monday December 18th.  

 

A Review Of Addi Flexi Flips (addiCraSyTrio)

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Disclaimer: I purchased this product with my own money.  This product was not given to me for the purposes of review.  All opinions in this article are mine and I have not received any form of payment or compensation.  The links in this article are not affiliate links, I don’t benefit in any way if you click them.  

When I first heard about Addi Flexi Flips (I’m told my European friends know them as Addi CraSyTrio) I wanted to try them.  I have an innate *need* to try all things related to sock knitting.  I immediately (in September) ordered them from a local LYS and waited patiently for them to arrive from Germany.  They arrived last week!

What Are They?

These needles come in a package of 3 with a long test-tube-style hard plastic case.  They are a cross between DPNs and circular needles:  the 3.5 inch/9 centimetre metal tips are connected by a short 1 inch/2.5 centimetre cord between them for a total needle length of 8 inches/20 centimetres, measured tip to tip.  The idea is to cast your stitches onto 2 needles and use the 3rd needle to work the sts.  

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First Impression

Addi needles have a reputation for being high quality, and these needles are priced accordingly.  This set of needles set me back $32CAD (for perspective, I could purchase 6 sets of 2.25mm nickel 32 inch fixed circs from Knitpicks for the same amount of money).   

The tips are reminiscent of my other Addi needles: the cords are flexible, and the joins are smooth to the touch.  The information included with the needles explains that each needle has 2 different tips: one tip is the Addi Turbo tip and the other is the sharper Addi Rocket tip.  To be honest, I have trouble differentiating the tips and I have to poke my finger with both tips to determine which end is the sharper of the two.

Casting On

When knitting small circumference in the round, I use either magic loop or 4 DPNs (depending on which needles are available to me at the time).  I love and use both methods equally.  That being said, using these needles felt like knitting with DPNs, but less fiddly.  The quality is great, and the joins are super smooth.  I was able to adapt to them very quickly and I’m really enjoying knitting with them.  I haven’t turned a heel or worked a toe with them yet, but I don’t anticipate having any needle-related issues with either.

My Addi Flexi Flips in action...

My Addi Flexi Flips in action...

Bottom Line

Pros: high quality, choice of 2 tips with each needle, these would make great cable needles, they are easy to adapt to and would be ideal if you like magic loop but don’t like the cord, or if you like DPNs but wish you could use fewer needles.  

Cons: premium priced, the tips are difficult to distinguish from each other, the needle size is printed on the needle tip in silver which is really difficult to read, knitting socks two-at-a-time would not be possible with these needles.  

I would recommend this needles if:

  • You like to try all the things

  • Like DPNs but wish you could use fewer needles

  • Like Magic loop but dislike the excess cord

  • Like 2 circular needles but dislike the excess cord

I would not recommend these needles if:

  • You want to knit socks two-at-a-time

  • You want a more affordable needle

Have you used Addi Flexi Flips?  What do you think?

Who You Gonna Call?

Don't Cross The Streams has been released into the world...

Do you remember that line from the original Ghostbusters movie? Well that line has inspired 2 yarn colourways and a sock pattern.  

Green and purple are two of my favourite colours! I love them both. In all shades and when they're together, they make my heart sing! When Petra (the talented dyer at Undercover Otter) and I were talking about colours, I sent her some Pinterest photos of green and purple together. As a result of that conversation she made these colourways, 'I've Been Slimed!' and 'There is only Zuul'. Green and purple remind Petra of Ghostbusters (which is very cool), so in keeping with the theme, I've designed 'Don't Cross The Streams'.

Worked from the cuff down, 'Don't Cross The Streams' uses mosaic colourwork (only one colour is used on each row - no floats to deal with!) and slipped sts to create the cabled stitch pattern on the front of the leg and top of the foot. The sock features an afterthought heel (so as not to disturb the rhythm of the stitch pattern) and a rounded toe. The pattern is graded for 4 circumferences and the foot length is customizable. 

You can download 'Don't Cross The Streams' with a 25% discount until Monday November 27th, 2017 - no coupon code required. 


 

Indie Design GAL

The Indie Design Gift Along has started on Ravelry.  Over 200 knit and crochet designers are offering over 5,000 patterns at 25% off until Tuesday.  You can find my bundle of patterns here. 

Guess What Time It Is?

It's time for the Indie Designer Giftalong on Ravelry! I'm proud to be a participating designer for the 4th year in a row! 

The Indie Designer Gift-A-Long is an annual event on Ravelry where a large group (like hundreds) of knit and crochet designers pool their talents and patterns and offer a pre-holiday sales event followed by a huge KAL/CAL with lots of fun and prizes. 

Each designer offers a 'bundle' of their self-published patterns at a 25% discount during the sale period of November 21st - 28th. The coupon code is giftalong2017. You'll be able to find the patterns that I'm offering in the sale by clicking here (It's hidden until tomorrow - the big reveal for everything GAL related is November 21st).

I've had a behind-the-scenes peek and some awesome prizes have been donated this year! You can find the GAL (giftalong) by clicking here.  Will you be taking part in the GAL this year?  I hope to see you around the GAL forums on Ravelry! 

Bloom Where You're Planted

Bloom Where You're Planted has been released into the world...

The first time I saw this yarn I loved the delicate pink colour and the effect of the deeper flecks of pink speckled throughout the skein. My first thought was "this reminds me of cherry blossoms". When I contacted Emjay (the super talented dyer behind JOMA yarn) to tell her how gorgeous this yarn is, she told me that where she lives there isn't very much snow, but when the cherry trees release their blossoms and pink petals cascade through the air and gather in drifts on ground it's known as 'Pink Snow' which was the inspiration for this colourway. She captured it beautifully!

In addition to being good advice for life in general, "Bloom Where You're Planted" is inspired by cherry blossoms and growth so I wanted a pattern that would grow with the sock. 'Bloom Where You're Planted' is worked toe up and features a delicate, easy to memorize cable pattern that grows and 'blooms' as the sock grows and blooms. The sock features a sole flap and gussets and the stitch pattern continues on the front and back of the leg to the cuff. The pattern is graded for 5 circumferences and the foot length is customizable. 

You can download Bloom Where You're Planted with a 20% discount (no coupon code required) until Monday November 13th, 2017.  

 

In Other News...

I'm offering a new 5 day email challenge!  #SockGuru starts on Monday and will introduce you to new toe, heel, and cuff techniques for toe up socks! There will be fun and prizes and you can join the #SockStar Facebook group for fun and support (join the Facebook group anyway, we're an awesome bunch of sock knitters!)  You can sign up for the #SockGuru email challenge by clicking here.   This is my 4th email challenge, and might be my last for a while.  They are tons of fun, and super popular, but they are also lots of work and between design commitments, tech editing, and a book that I have in the works (yup, a book!),  I'll have to take a break from on-line teaching. 

Happy Knitting!